U.S. Culture and Etiquette Test

U.S. Culture and Etiquette Test

What does the 'NASDAQ' stand for?
a. National Association of Securities Dealers Automatic Quotation System.
b. National Administration of Secure Dealing Arrival Quotation System.
c. Natural Association of System Dealers Annual Quotidian Sound.
d. Natural Avocation of Software Dealers Annual Quota System.
e. National Annuity of Special Diagnostics Actual Quotations Sounds.
When is it appropriate to point at someone?
a. Pointing is acceptable behavior in the US office (and in general).
b. Pointing is very rude in the US office (and in general), and could lead to your dismissal.
c. Pointing is considered rude in the US office (and in general), except if it is clear you are pointing to an object.
d. Pointing is rude in the US office (and in general)only if you use two hands. Pointing with one hand is fine.
e. None of the above.
In the US, smoking is banned in many states in public places. Which of the following US states has NOT banned smoking in public places, especially places of work?
a. Texas
b. Arizona
c. Maine
d. New York State
e. California
How much is a 'touchdown' worth in American football, if you include 'the extra point'?
a. 5 + 1 = 6
b. 7 + 1 = 8
c. 5 + 3 = 8
d. 6 + 1 = 7
e. 1 + 4 = 5
What are 'states' rights' in the US?
a. The legal rights of US states whether in alignment or conflict with the US Federal system.
b. A political argument based on the tenth amendment of the United States Constitution.
c. An argument used by the Southern American states during the American Civil War (1861-1865).
d. Often a last-resort political argument used by all political camps when they are unable to win at the Federal level, in the belief that they can win political ground in at least some states.
e. All of the above
Which of the following best describes how to offer a good business-style handshake in the US?
a. A reasonably swift handshake, lasting about 1 second, upon greeting and leaving, without eye contact.
b. A reasonably firm handshake, lasting 3-4 seconds, upon greeting and leaving, maintaining good eye contact.
c. A light handshake, lasting 3-4 seconds, upon greeting and leaving, maintaining wide-eyed contact.
d. A very firm handshake, lasting 3-4 seconds, upon greeting and leaving, maintaining good eye contact.
e. A reasonably firm handshake, lasting 5-10 seconds, upon greeting and leaving, maintaining good eye contact.
What is a 'franchise' in US sports?
a. The selling price of a particular team, not including the annual ticket sales.
b. The annual tickets sales for a particular team.
c. The financial worth of a team including the players.
d. A team or the legal arrangement that establishes ownership of a team (often as a branch or relocation of a previously existing team).
e. The sum of the players' contracts on a team.
What does it mean to 'push the envelope' in the US?
a. To stack a crate with envelopes and then push it, typically in an office environment.
b. To hand someone an envelope.
c. To stretch the normal boundaries or limits (without undue risk) in an attempt to be successful.
d. To be an individual, especially in a group setting.
What is the Super Bowl?
a. The championship game of Minor League Baseball.
b. The championship game of the National Basketball Association.
c. The championship game of Major League Baseball.
d. The championship game of the National Football League.
e. The championship game of the National Hockey League.
What does 'the fourth estate' commonly refer to in the US?
a. The public press.
b. The right to vote or protest.
c. The TV and radio networks specifically.
d. The industrial-military complex.
e. The general public.
What does 'laissez-faire' refer to in US politics?
a. A private equity investment fund for the super-rich.
b. A political doctrine opposing government intervention in economic affairs, beyond the minimum necessary to maintain property and peace.
c. A doctrine balancing government intervention in the financial free market, with the emphasis on government action.
d. A doctrine for the expansion of welfare rights in the US.
e. A doctrine for government intervention in economic affairs, should the financial system be at risk from collapse (such as the sub-prime mortgage crisis).
What does the term 'off-peak' refer to when traveling in the US?
a. A special fare, usually a supplement, that will bring you to your destination faster, using, for example, an express train.
b. A time when travel is less busy, and fares are usually lower.
c. A reduced-price fare traveling at the regular time.
d. It is the same as an open-ticket (meaning you do not have a reserved seat).
e. You pay slightly less, but you do not quite reach your destination (hence the reduced fare).
How would you define being 'politically correct' or 'PC'?
a. To be a part of a random system of voting at the ballot box.
b. Being rude or offensive in a way that violates social customs or general good manners.
c. To express a political opinion usually on social matters and often characterized by the rejection of language, behavior, etc. considered discriminatory or offensive.
d. To pay all your taxes and to obey all laws, both state and federal.
e. To make a decisive political action, usually taken by a politician to win an election.
Which of the following is NOT an occasion for tipping in the US?
a. When getting a haircut.
b. When taking a taxi.
c. When paying a bar or restaurant bill.
d. When helped with bags at a hotel.
e. When served drinks on an airplane.
In US employment and education law, what is an H-1B Visa compared to a F-1 visa?
a. Both H-1B and F-1 visas are work visas.
b. An F-1 is a work visa valid for the duration of employment; an H-1B is a student visa valid for the duration of study.
c. An F-1 is a work visa; an H-1B is a student visa.
d. Both H-1B and F-1 visas are student visas.
e. An H-1B is a work visa; an F-1 is a student visa.
What does it mean to 'pull strings' in the US?
a. To receive business bribes behind the scenes in exchange preferential treatment, always in an illegal political sense.
b. To receive stolen goods or act otherwise outside the law.
c. To prepare taxes many months in advance.
d. To exercise influence over a decision, typically in a less than overt manner or 'behind the scenes'.
e. To operate a traveling puppet show, especially in the South.
What is the difference between the US and European style of using a knife and fork?
a. In the European or "Continental" style, the fork is in your left hand while cutting, then switches to your right hand to pick up and eat. In the US style, the fork is always in the left hand.
b. In the US style, the fork is in your right hand while cutting, then switches to your left hand to pick up and eat. In the European or "Continental" style, the fork is always in the right hand.
c. In the US style, the fork is in your right hand while cutting, then switches to your left hand to pick up and eat. In the European or "Continental" style, the fork is always in the left hand.
d. In the US style, the fork is in your left hand while cutting, then switches to your right hand to pick up and eat. In the European or "Continental" style, the fork is always in the left hand.
e. In the US style, the fork is always in your right hand. In the European or "Continental" style, the fork is always in the left hand.
What is 'propaganda'?
a. A lie or untruth told by the government always for the benefit of all countries.
b. The spreading of misinformation or rumor solely in order to injure an organization, a cause or a person.
c. The spreading of information or rumor in order to help or injure an organization, a cause or a person – often associated with misinformation or outright lies.
d. The name of the ballot papers used in a national presidential election.
e. The 4-year waiting term between elections in the US.
What is the appropriate dress for a business meeting in the US?
a. Formal clothing, such as a suit and tie for men, a suit or dress and jacket for women.
b. Informal clothing, such as khaki shorts for men, light beach-like clothing for women.
c. Formal clothing for formal events, especially in major US cities, slightly less formal clothing in rural areas and in hot parts of the US, such as the South.
d. Fancy dress or costume.
e. Tuxedo.
Are business cards used in the US, and when are they exchanged?
a. Yes – and they are generally exchanged when meeting, or parting, though there is no strict rule.
b. Yes – and they are always exchanged when meeting.
c. Yes – and they are always exchanged when parting.
d. No – but they are sometimes generally exchanged halfway through a meeting.
e. No – but they are exchanged on special request.
What is a team's 'territory' in both American football and basketball?
a. The half of the pitch or court that a team protects against its opponents.
b. The basket in basketball or touchline in football where points are scored.
c. The length of time on the clock for an entire game (without including over-time).
d. The captain of the team.
e. The mound inside the diamond in baseball from where the pitcher throws the ball.
Who are 'the powers that be' in the US?
a. The incoming government.
b. Parents or grandparents.
c. Neighbours and/or your boss at work.
d. A generic term for those in authority.
e. A generic term for descendants (who hold their own kind of power).
Which of the following is considered poor table manners in the US?
a. Slurping soup.
b. Starting to eat before others at the same table.
c. Using a toothpick or blowing nose at the table.
d. Chewing with your mouth open.
e. All of the above.
Which of the following is appropriate in a US restaurant if you do not eat all of your food?
a. To request a bag to take home the leftovers.
b. Never request a bag to take home the leftovers.
c. To request the food be saved so you can pick it up later.
d. To request the food be given to the wait staff.
e. None of the above
What is a 'green card' in the US?
a. The common name for a VISA identity card issued by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. A green card entitles a foreign national to enter and reside but not work in the US.
b. The common name for a Permanent Resident identity card issued by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. A green card entitles a foreign national to enter, reside and work in the US.
c. The common name for a VISA identity card issued by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. A green card entitles a foreign national to work in the US for 6 months.
d. The official name for a Permanent Resident identity card issued by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. A green card entitles a US Citizen to enter, reside and work overseas.
e. The official name for a Permanent Resident identity card issued by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. A green card entitles a foreign national to enter, reside and work in the US indefinitely.
Which of the following is expected in a US office environment?
a. Chewing gum.
b. Knocking before entering.
c. Displaying tattoos.
d. Displaying body piercings.
e. Using your iPod at work.
What is a 'hub' in US travel?
a. A major train terminal, for example, Grand Central in New York City.
b. An airport where an airline has a major presence that includes many flights to other destinations. For example, Delta Airlines has a hub in Atlanta.
c. A destination airport to which a lot of other airways connect into but not out from, for example, New Orleans.
d. A starting city from where a lot of other airlines depart, for example, JFK to Europe.
e. A 'hub' is a major television network that broadcasts travel news, for example, NBC, CBS or ABC.
What is a 'rookie' in US sports slang?
a. An older, more experienced player who generally leads the team.
b. A team mascot.
c. A new player to the team who is relatively inexperienced.
d. A rank-and-file player who neither leads the team nor stands out for being new.
e. The owner of the team.
Which of the following is fast becoming a public taboo in the US workplace?
a. Drinking
b. Smoking
c. Eating
d. Talking
e. Smiling
How much personal space is typical in the US, in both the workplace and in public?
a. About an arm's length, otherwise Americans will feel uncomfortable.
b. About a foot.
c. About two arms' length.
d. About three arms' length.
What is 'AMTRAK' in the US?
a. The name of a major bus company.
b. The name of a major train airline.
c. The name of a major train company.
d. The name of the minor league baseball division.
e. The name of a major taxi company.
During a US 'business dinner', what is the appropriate behavior in terms of how much business and how much socializing is common?
a. A business dinner is treated as a social meal –socializing is more important than the business.
b. A business dinner is still treated as a business meal – socializing should be kept to an absolute minimum or it is considered rude.
c. A business dinner should be long and dull – do not attempt to make general or light conversation.
d. A business dinner is treated as a social meal and a time to build rapport – socializing is as important as the business itself.
e. None of the above
What is a 'twin room' when booking at a US hotel?
a. A room with two beds for two people.
b. Two rooms with two beds for two people.
c. A room with one bed for one person.
d. Two rooms with one bed for two people.
e. A room with a double bed for two people.
What does it mean to 'keep your nose to the grindstone' in the US?
a. To repeat the same action even if the result appears to be the same (negative) one.
b. To keep working hard at a difficult task.
c. To generate a lot of personal wealth and secure it in an offshore account to avoid taxes.
d. To take early morning walks on the beach as a healthy preparation for the day ahead.
e. To continue digging yourself deeper into a metaphorical hole, often in a business setting, even though you know it is wrong to do so.
What does it mean to 'pull one's weight' or 'pull your own weight' in the US?
a. To try harder than you've ever had to try before.
b. To literally lose weight, using a gym and/or personal trainer.
c. To make a concerted effort to do what one is capable of, especially when contributing to a group effort.
d. To make a solitary personal effort to overcome an obstacle.
e. To go on a 30-day crash diet, but only one approved by your doctor.
What does the phrase 'to pour cold water on' mean in common US usage?
a. To discourage or quench enthusiasm for something.
b. To encourage something by figuratively hydrating it.
c. To hurry up, literally or figuratively.
d. To slow down, literally or figuratively.
e. To deliver a message at speed to someone.
Which of the following is the best response if you make a mistake at work?
a. Find someone to blame.
b. Ignore it.
c. Accept responsibility and set about correcting the mistake.
d. Deny you made any mistake and start crying.
e. Find someone to share the blame.
When using e-mail, why is it NOT a good idea to type in CAPITAL LETTERS?
a. Because you might spell a word incorrectly.
b. Because the message won't reach its destination in capitals.
c. Because Caps Lock may stay on and you'll type everything in capitals.
d. Because it sounds like you're shouting at the e-mail recipient.
e. Because it sounds like you don't know how to write.
What is generally considered the good amount of tipping in the US?
a. 5%
b. 10%
c. 15-25%
d. 25-35%
e. 35-40%
What does 'bumping' mean when traveling by airplane in the US?
a. Adding a passenger without a reservation to a flight. Generally the first passengers to check-in are the ones most likely to be bumped.
b. Removing a passenger with a reservation from a full flight. Generally the last passengers to check-in are the ones most likely to be bumped.
c. Removing a passenger with a reservation from a full flight. Generally the first passengers to check-in are the ones most likely to be bumped.
d. Adding a passenger to an earlier flight if he or she arrives early enough at the airport.
e. Exchanging tickets for a later flight, often with a favorable monetary return for the passenger.
If you bring a personal cell phone to work, you should:
a. leave it on.
b. make sure it is on mute.
c. give it to your boss to look after.
d. send text messages all day.
e. consult it every 5 minutes.
What is the correct wearing of a hat in the US office?
a. It is frowned upon to wear a hat at work, but most people do not mind if that is your personal preference.
b. It is generally impolite to wear hats inside. A hat may be worn in a public corridor and elevator, but it should be removed when entering a room.
c. It is rude and even illegal to wear a hat inside. Remove it as soon as you enter the building.
d. Hats are banned in public, inside and outside, in several US States.
e. None of the above
What do 'March madness,' the 'sweet sixteen' and the 'final four' refer to in the US sporting calendar?
a. The PGA Tour Golf Championship
b. The NCAA basketball tournament
c. The Super Bowl
d. The Olympic Swimming Team
e. The baseball World Series
Which of the following represents a typical American breakfast as served in a hotel?
a. Fried bread, eggs, black pudding, bacon; also hamburgers.
b. Donuts and coffee.
c. Choice of donuts, bagels, fruit, coffee and orange juice; also a cooked breakfast of eggs, bacon, 'link' sausages, pancakes and French toast.
d. German potato salad, scones, rolls, tea with milk.
e. Blini with sour cream or milk.
Which of the following are essential to any current US office environment?
a. Instant message, scanner.
b. Phone, instant message, fax.
c. Fax, printer, scanner, website.
d. Phone, fax, e-mail, printer, website, instant message, scanner.
e. Website, scanner, instant message.
In the US, what is the best way to say 'thank you' after a business arrangement?
a. Send a Christmas present to your recipient's home to all the family.
b. Gift giving is discouraged by many US companies - a gracious written note or invitation for a meal is more appropriate.
c. The bigger the gift the better: business in the US thrives on across-the-table gift giving.
d. Pay 10% extra to the amount of the business deal (it acts as a tip).
e. Pay 20% extra to the amount of the business deal (it acts as a tip).
Which of the following is considered the least popular sport in the US?
a. Basketball
b. Athletics
c. (American) Football
d. Baseball
e. (Ice) Hockey
Which of the following should arrive within ten minutes of sitting down at a US restaurant, without asking the server?
a. Water
b. Milk
c. Beer
d. The wine list
e. The specials menu
Used for navigating, what does 'GPS' stand for when driving a car in the US?
a. Gradual Position Site
b. Group Posture Section
c. Gradual Position Segway
d. Global Positioning System
e. Greater Positive Seat
What is a 'drop-off charge' when renting a car in the US?
a. A fee the rental company pays the customer for returning the vehicle to its original location.
b. A small hidden device carried in the rental car to track the exact location of the car, often by GPS.
c. The option to drop the car off in any of three locations close to the original point of departure.
d. A fee charged by a car rental company when not returning the vehicle to its original location.
e. An optional fee charged by the rental company to defray taxes, especially for tourists (i.e. foreign nationals).
What is a connecting flight in US air travel?
a. The taxi up the runway a plane makes after it has landed.
b. The middle part of a three or four part flight, using a different form of transport – like a helicopter.
c. The second part of a two-part flight, using a different airline.
d. The first part of a two-part flight, using the same airline.
e. Part of an ongoing flight that requires a change of aircraft, but not necessarily a change of airline.
When conducting international business in the US, you must be aware of laws at which of the following levels?
a. State level.
b. Federal level.
c. State and Federal.
d. State, Federal and international level.
e. Federal and international level.

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